Hertsmere Borough Council consults residents on Elstree Way Corridor Area Action Plan

Borehamwood Times: A part of the Elstree Way Corridor A part of the Elstree Way Corridor

A consultation has begun on development plans that will change the face of Borehamwood.

Hertsmere Borough Council voted this week to seek the views of residents on a new draft of the Elstree Way Corridor Area Action Plan.

The plan for at least 800 houses along the Elstree Way has been updated following a public consultation and meetings, in which residents said the new homes would put undue strain on Borehamwood’s infrastructure.

It now includes an alternative site for a primary school at Hertswood Academy’s new site, as well as three possible sites for a health centre.

The new draft reverses proposals to remove the Tesco and Shenley Road roundabouts and instead improve pedestrian crossings.

It also seeks to extend the action plan to include Manor Way after developers said they wished to transform a number of office blocks into houses on the street.

Speaking at Wednesday's meeting at the Civic Offices in Elstree Way, councillors urged residents to write in and ensure their voices were heard.

Council leader Councillor Morris Bright said: “If people feel truly passionately as I know they do about the concerns they have about planning they must get in touch. This can’t just fall on the heads of local councillors, it must fall on heads of everyone together.

“Let’s not forget if we had our own way we probably wouldn’t want to build anymore, the developments are being thrust upon us by the Government.

“If we don’t find a way of moving together we will get willy nilly development that won’t fit in and will be a complete mess. People will ask in future why we didn’t do something to sort it out.”

Cllr Bright also urged people to write in with sensible suggestions about what development they did and did not want so they would not come across as nimbys.

Cllr Pat Strack raised concerns about the scale of the development, and its impact on the lives of residents.

She said: “As a borough councillor with family, friends and neighbours and representing residents in this town I urge all to write in and make their comments about the proposals.

“Many of us are very unhappy with the proposed building developments in our town.  We have not been given the full picture. Actually the total number of houses is 1,500, there are sites abutting corridor in Thrift Farm Lane and Studio Way. I don’t think the infrastructure would be able to cope.

“Let the councillors and the Government know what you really think and what your fears are about our town becoming urban sprawl, with one large traffic jam and people packed tightly in.”

Cllr Ann Harrison echoed Cllr Strack’s concerns the plans were “misleading” about the number of houses actually proposed.

She urged people to write in individually rather than send in petitions as “letters have far more impact on planning officers and the secretary of state”.

Cllr Harvey Cohen, who has responsibility for planning, said Government legislation meant the council could not stop development, only have the plans in place to manage it as best it could.

He said: “We have to provide homes, we just have to make sure planned homes are placed where thre is infrastructure and on brown field, rather than greenbelt sites.

“We can’t stop the development. We need to have a plan so we can have some sort of control over how it is placed and where it is placed and that’s why it is going out for consultation. We need to hear everyone views.”

The consultation runs until March 5.

Comments (8)

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3:36pm Fri 24 Jan 14

pwelsh says...

i am glad this article appears in the bwood times but this newspaper is circulated to less than half the homes in the town. on such an important issue why can't the council issue a leaflet to every home ? yes there is a cost of perhaps £2,000 to print and circulate but what does the mayor's civic dinner cost and what does the council pay to consultants every year ? such a cost would be a fraction of those costs. we need to engage as many residents as possible.
Cllr Harvey Cohen states that in reality we have no control but we can hope to decide what goes where . that is a bit like the captain of the titanic announcing the ship will sink but let's discuss where we place the deckchairs in the meantime.
when are the council going to have the guts to launch a review and consultation of the 'green belt' across the borough which currently protects most of the borough? even the green belt society agree there are sites labelled as 'green belt' that could be reviewed and do the public realise 'green belt' does include areas such as tarmaced car parks ?
i am glad this article appears in the bwood times but this newspaper is circulated to less than half the homes in the town. on such an important issue why can't the council issue a leaflet to every home ? yes there is a cost of perhaps £2,000 to print and circulate but what does the mayor's civic dinner cost and what does the council pay to consultants every year ? such a cost would be a fraction of those costs. we need to engage as many residents as possible. Cllr Harvey Cohen states that in reality we have no control but we can hope to decide what goes where . that is a bit like the captain of the titanic announcing the ship will sink but let's discuss where we place the deckchairs in the meantime. when are the council going to have the guts to launch a review and consultation of the 'green belt' across the borough which currently protects most of the borough? even the green belt society agree there are sites labelled as 'green belt' that could be reviewed and do the public realise 'green belt' does include areas such as tarmaced car parks ? pwelsh
  • Score: 9

7:14pm Sat 25 Jan 14

harveycohen says...

Paul , a full feature on the Elstree Way Corridor Plan , with details of how the public can submit their views, was in the last edition of hertsmere news which was circulated to every home in Hertsmere.
The council , in preparing their housing plans for this core strategy , a few years ago, consulted across Hertsmere about where t he public would like to see future development. A large majority was against building on green built and wanted future building to be on existing brownfield sites.

I would urge residents to look through the draft action plan during this last stage of consultation and we look forward to receiving their comments.
Paul , a full feature on the Elstree Way Corridor Plan , with details of how the public can submit their views, was in the last edition of hertsmere news which was circulated to every home in Hertsmere. The council , in preparing their housing plans for this core strategy , a few years ago, consulted across Hertsmere about where t he public would like to see future development. A large majority was against building on green built and wanted future building to be on existing brownfield sites. I would urge residents to look through the draft action plan during this last stage of consultation and we look forward to receiving their comments. harveycohen
  • Score: 0

11:43am Sun 26 Jan 14

pwelsh says...

thankyou Harvey. regarding the green belt question. as you say Hertsmere did consult but that was as you say years ago. plus was it not only about 1,000 people surveyed - a very small percentage of residents.
the resultant answer no building in green belt was obvious as it protected the vast majority of the borough and naturally people living in those areas would so no.
secondly how was the question phrased ? naturally people think of green belt as lovely natural countryside but don't know that it includes 'derelict' fields and even car parks. was that explained ?
is it not time to seek a new mandate on this issue especially from borehamwood residents who are bearing the biggest burden in what may now be an outdated policy regarding green belt
thankyou Harvey. regarding the green belt question. as you say Hertsmere did consult but that was as you say years ago. plus was it not only about 1,000 people surveyed - a very small percentage of residents. the resultant answer no building in green belt was obvious as it protected the vast majority of the borough and naturally people living in those areas would so no. secondly how was the question phrased ? naturally people think of green belt as lovely natural countryside but don't know that it includes 'derelict' fields and even car parks. was that explained ? is it not time to seek a new mandate on this issue especially from borehamwood residents who are bearing the biggest burden in what may now be an outdated policy regarding green belt pwelsh
  • Score: 2

10:15pm Mon 27 Jan 14

Mill-Hill-Boy says...

I haven't seen the plans. Is there anything about improving rail travel, and providing a link for borehamwood and elstree residents to the tube as an extension from edgeware or stanmore. Has the council thought of that? There were plans in the past (in the 1940s) and it would greatly relieve congestion and improve commuting to the area and out of the area. Without planning future rail links I fear the entire area may be gridlocked even if roads are improved slightly. It's worth exploring this topic (infrastructure) as the town considers it's future and develops more housing.
I haven't seen the plans. Is there anything about improving rail travel, and providing a link for borehamwood and elstree residents to the tube as an extension from edgeware or stanmore. Has the council thought of that? There were plans in the past (in the 1940s) and it would greatly relieve congestion and improve commuting to the area and out of the area. Without planning future rail links I fear the entire area may be gridlocked even if roads are improved slightly. It's worth exploring this topic (infrastructure) as the town considers it's future and develops more housing. Mill-Hill-Boy
  • Score: 6

3:52pm Thu 30 Jan 14

hellraiser says...

I agree with paul that green belt is a matter of definition and I couldn't agree more with mill hill boy as a non-car driver and member of local transport forum that public transport needs to be massively improved and integrated and made attractive enough as in continental cities to discourage drivers off the road
I agree with paul that green belt is a matter of definition and I couldn't agree more with mill hill boy as a non-car driver and member of local transport forum that public transport needs to be massively improved and integrated and made attractive enough as in continental cities to discourage drivers off the road hellraiser
  • Score: 2

3:55pm Thu 30 Jan 14

mr.taxpayer says...

I have an idea..

Why not just knock down all the schools and colleges in Borehamwood, and build some expensive flats on them. Then once thats done, find any remaining scrap of green open space in Borehamwood, and then build flats on those. Once that's complete, knock down all the pubs in Borehamwood and build flats on those.


Oh hold on.....
I have an idea.. Why not just knock down all the schools and colleges in Borehamwood, and build some expensive flats on them. Then once thats done, find any remaining scrap of green open space in Borehamwood, and then build flats on those. Once that's complete, knock down all the pubs in Borehamwood and build flats on those. Oh hold on..... mr.taxpayer
  • Score: 3

11:16am Fri 31 Jan 14

kelvin says...

The greenbelt should NEVER be touched by developments,in my opinion.
The greenbelt should NEVER be touched by developments,in my opinion. kelvin
  • Score: -1

1:35pm Fri 31 Jan 14

cpmorrison82 says...

mr.taxpayer wrote:
I have an idea..

Why not just knock down all the schools and colleges in Borehamwood, and build some expensive flats on them. Then once thats done, find any remaining scrap of green open space in Borehamwood, and then build flats on those. Once that's complete, knock down all the pubs in Borehamwood and build flats on those.


Oh hold on.....
This seems to be the attitude of those in favour of mass development along the corridor.

If this needs to happen so be it but without pubs, open space, schools large enough to cope and further health centres I'm afraid it's going to be a disaster.

Do you really want Borehamwood to become a place solely to rest in between going to and from work with no sense of community or pride in the area?
[quote][p][bold]mr.taxpayer[/bold] wrote: I have an idea.. Why not just knock down all the schools and colleges in Borehamwood, and build some expensive flats on them. Then once thats done, find any remaining scrap of green open space in Borehamwood, and then build flats on those. Once that's complete, knock down all the pubs in Borehamwood and build flats on those. Oh hold on.....[/p][/quote]This seems to be the attitude of those in favour of mass development along the corridor. If this needs to happen so be it but without pubs, open space, schools large enough to cope and further health centres I'm afraid it's going to be a disaster. Do you really want Borehamwood to become a place solely to rest in between going to and from work with no sense of community or pride in the area? cpmorrison82
  • Score: -1

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